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ASA Washington DC Roundtable - Reforming Advanced Illness and End-of-Life Care: The Way Forward
Event Date: 
09.26.2017 08:00 AM - 10:30 AM
Time Zone: 
(GMT-05:00) Eastern Time
Event Location
Address 1: 
Samuel J. Simmons NCBA Estates
Address 2: 
2801 14th Street, NW
City: 
Washington
State: 
DISTRICTOFCOLUMBIA
Zip: 
20001
Short Description: 

Briefing on Spring 2017 issue of Generations

Full Description: 

The American Society on Aging (ASA) Presents a Briefing

on Reforming Advanced Illness and End-of-Life Care: The Way Forward
 

Please join us for a presentation and panel discussion on the landscape, challenges, and advocacy surrounding advanced illness and end-of-life care, as covered in the Spring 2017 issue of Generations.

When:                Tuesday, September 26, 2017
                            8:00 am to 10:30 am

Where:               Community Room
Samuel J. Simmons NCBA Estates
2801 14th Street, NW
Washington, D.C.
This location is two blocks from the Columbia Heights Metro Station.
Refreshments will be served. This event is free-of-charge, however, registration is required. Registration link.

What:                 The agenda.

Why:                   

Today, as the baby boomer population continues to grow older and Americans live longer and healthier lives than in previous generations, current estimates suggest that the number of Americans over the age of 85 is estimated to reach 18 million by 2050. Many individuals may experience multiple chronic conditions or functional impairments at older ages and eventually face advanced illness, which occurs when one or more conditions become serious enough that general health and functioning begin to decline. These people will experience a range of spiritual, emotional, and physical needs that will become increasingly complex as they move on a trajectory toward the end of life. Yet, during these years, they often receive care that is uncoordinated, fragmented, and most importantly, unable to meet their evolving goals, values, and preferences.

Over the past few decades, our perceptions regarding end-of-life care have shifted drastically. Through the release of reports by the National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) including the 1997 Approaching Death: Improving Care at the End-of-Life to the more recent 2014 Dying in America report, it is clear that the issue of end-of-life care has risen to become a national priority. Reports such as these have increased public awareness and have educated the stakeholder community on the key gaps and barriers that need to be addressed to improve the personal experience at the end of life.

Spring 2017 Generations discussed a paradigm shift in our thinking: focusing care on how goals of life begin to change rather than on a series of clinical conditions and interventions leading to advanced illness. Our understanding of the care continuum is shifting from a series of medical states or conditions transitioning to “terminal” illness to a more integrated approach based on “what matters most” to the individual. Contributors, which included the panelists listed below, identified both current challenges and future opportunities to reform end-of-life care in America, and addressed three major themes:  

Advancing the Public Dialogue and Redesigning Care;  Strengthening Caregivers and the Workforce; and Driving Policy Change. 

ASA invites you to join us at a special Roundtable event to hear from Washington DC Roundtable Chair Barbara Hoenig, Senior Consultant to CVS Health, Mature Workers & Workforce Initiatives, ASA President/CEO Bob Stein, and Generations Editorial Advisory Board Chair Susan Reinhard. Other speakers include panel moderator Bill Novelli, Co-guest Editor, Spring 2017 Generations,  Co-Chair, Coalition to Transform Advanced Care (C-TAC), and professor, McDonough School of Business, Georgetown University;  and Raca Banerjee, Co-guest Editor, Spring 2017 Generations. Novelli will moderate a panel discussion, featuring the four experts listed below who contributed to Spring 2017 Generations, and Banerjee will offer closing remarks.

Roundtable panelists: 

√  Patricia Bomba, M.D., Vice President and Medical Director for Geriatrics, Excellus BlueCross BlueShield, Rochester, NY

√  Andrew MacPherson, Principal, Healthsperien, Washington, DC

√  Malene Smith Davis, President and CEO, Capital Caring, Falls Church, VA

√  Helen Burstin, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer, National Quality Forum, Washington, DC

REGISTER TODAY! Registration is free, and requested, to attend. For assistance, contact Jutka at jmandoki@asaging.org

The Spring 2017 issue of Generations is available now! To read the issue online, go here.  To order print copies, or to subscribe to Generations journal, go to  http://www.asaging.org/generations-journal-american-society-aging.

The American Society on Aging (ASA), San Francisco, Calif., is the largest nonprofit, multi-disciplinary, non-partisan membership organization of professionals in the field of aging. Founded in 1954, ASA’s mission is to develop leadership abilities, knowledge and skills to help professionals address the challenges and opportunities of a diverse aging society. Now in its 61st year of service to the field, ASA has more than 6,000 members, subscribers and stakeholders. For more information, visit www.asaging.org.

We would like to extend a special thanks to our partner, CVS Health 

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